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Posts Tagged ‘Teenagers’

How My Teenage Son Grounded Me. It’s Not What You Think.

Just as my mother inculcated in me a love of literary fantasy so have my husband and I ignited an intellectual spark in the soul of our teenage son, Max. Mythological beasts, rings of power and tales of brave journeymen have rung in his ears since he was small. In fact I read The Hobbit to him just as my mom did for me (without the fireplace, I might add) and from the very book in which Mother’s fingers lingered on the corner of every page as she cradled the spine in the palm of her left hand.

My eldest son came of age in the era of Harry Potter, basking in the warm glow of anticipation with each subsequent publication of JK Rowling’s definitive works. And then, of course, it was Peter Jackson’s directors cut of the Lord of the Rings trilogy that sealed the deal for Max. I watch, now, as a complex, fascinating and self-assured young man steps out the door to take himself to places where I once was mandated to shepherd him. Our roles are changing and to my surprise his wisdom often overrules my own.

Such was the case when I shared over dinner about my new interest with opera and Richard Wagner’s Ring cycle. Max took to it immediately. His trip to Germany with my mother, the summer before, assured his interest in the language and the fact that JRR Tolkien drew inspiration from Wagner’s epic only sweetened the deal[1]. After we cleaned up from our home-cooked family meal we were on the computer pulling up suggestions for the authoritative recording of Das Rheingold, first of the four operas.

There were too many recommendations to pick from so my husband jokingly suggested we look up the recording that Francis Ford Coppola used in Apocalypse Now. “If it was good enough for Coppola it has be good enough for you guys.” Then he took a beat; “Of course, it may also be the cheapest version he could find so who knows if it really is any good or not.” My husband sure knows how to put things into perspective. So we found the Wiener Philharmoniker

(remember now, Germans pronounce their W’s like our V’s so it should sound like Vee-eh-ner. Ok, stop sniggering…if you can’t control yourself then just call it The Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra. Oy!)

So we downloaded Das Rheingold[2] onto iTunes and suddenly I am walking around listening to opera on my iPod.

Whoa! Stop the press!

(I wish there was a social media equivalent for this power statement. “Delete this entry!” simply does not have the gravitas I’m going for here.)

What the hell is going on?! (cue Talking Heads if you are interested in listening to the sound track in my head as I write.) I am forty-six years old. I’ve been married for nearly twenty years. There are teenagers and tweeners in my home AND I’M WALKING AROUND LISTENING TO HARD CORE OPERA!

Talking HeadsYou may ask yourself, how do I work this?
You may ask yourself, where is that large automobile?
You may tell yourself, this is not my beautiful house
You may tell yourself, this is not my beautiful wife
Letting the days go by, let the water hold me down
Letting the days go by, water flowing underground
Into the blue again, after the money’s gone
Once in a lifetime, water flowing underground
same as it ever was, same as it ever was, same as it ever was, same as it…[3]

One could call this a mid-life crisis. I amused and horrified myself each time I plugged in and allowed the sound of warbling operatic singers to wash over my once rebellious and opinionated ears. I joked about myself to my son and tried to make light of the veneer of shame I felt at the desire to buy tickets to the opera. I shook my head in disbelief that I had come to this point in my life and wondered aloud if it was all worth it.

Max stopped and looked me in the eye. “This is an adventure. You are discovering something new, something you didn’t know before. Stop worrying so much and have fun with it.” All pretense of being a wise and omnipotent parent ceased and I stood before a person whom I love and respect. “Ok, you’re right. Thank you.”

The morass that had been swirling about me for weeks calmed. I looked in the mirror later that night and saw a middle aged woman looking back at me. I smiled and saw her smile. I laughed and heard her laugh. Then a sigh of relief rose up deep within and I took a profoundly satisfying breath of air.

It was kind of thrilling to like opera.


[1] Another factor leading to Max’s immediate interest in the opera was that he had been treated to a back stage tour of the Met with his high school film & media class earlier that year. It was a real eye opener for him seeing the massive sets, the cavernous stage and the high tech HD broadcast set up. The sheer magnitude and opulence of the place blew his mind.

[2] It is important to note that the widely known and clichéd “Ride of the Valkure” which Coppola used in Apocalypse Now is from the second opera Die Walkure. Wiener Philharmoniker recorded Das Rheingold as well.

[3] Once in a Lifetime Songwriters: Brian Eno, Jerry Harrison, David Byrne, Tina Weymouth, Chris Frantz © EG MUSIC INC;WB MUSIC CORP.;INDEX MUSIC

Jewish Hipsters in Training / or / My Latest Project

My latest project is a non-fiction film. Many have asked so here is the treatment. Production is well underway and first round grant proposals are submitted & under review. Watch for updates about clips to be posted on YouTube this fall.MMN


Creating Community (WT)

A non-fiction, short-form film

With the memory of bar and bat mitzvah parties faded into history, eleven teenagers who have basically one thing in common, a Hebrew School in lower Manhattan,  come to the realization that there is, indeed,  Jewish life after middle school.

An extraordinary group of ordinary teens attending diverse secular schools in New York City choose to study together beyond their bar and bat mitvah’s to prepare for a trip to Israel. This group soon realizes more than a trip is being planned; community is being forged. As they spend a year together learning and taking on adult Jewish responsibilities they face challenges none could have predicted or ever asked for.  This bonds them into a community that transcends race, class or level of religious observance. It is one where they support and strengthen each other as they make the transition into high school and early adulthood. Their work culminates in an extraordinary journey through Israel, a first visit for many in the group. Their lives, the lives of their families and those of the community around them are forever altered by what they have created together.

Noah, Sigal, Tiye, Jordan, Max, Noya, Lexi, Alix, Haley (David & Daniella couldn't make the shoot)Photo by Scott Newirth

Noah, Sigal, Tiye, Jordan, Max, Noya, Lexi, Alix, Haley (David & Daniella couldn’t make the shoot)

This short-form documentary captures the essence of community these kids have forged on their own initiative and celebrates the rising generation of Jewish men and women who are the link for future generations to come.

Produced by MSM&A Productions